Author: Melinda Nickels

The Abundance of Late Summer and the Earth 土 Element of Chinese Medicine

“It’s August, there’s always more to eat”, my dad announced as he came in from his garden with an armful of green beans, tomatoes, ears of corn, and cucumbers. I was at my parents’ home in Ellensburg, Washington for a few days to help my mom recover from knee surgery.

Usually I don’t make it over to their home in August, so I was getting a rare treat of the bounty of my dad’s garden.

My dad grew up farming, and though he eventually became an accountant, you can’t take the farm out of him. All my life he’s had a huge garden, now over a thousand square feet in size and a little orchard as well. Basically a small scale farm. This time of year he and my mom are busily canning green beans, pickles, and jams of multiple varieties, drying prunes, and freezing what can’t be canned or dried. And of course, eating as much of this delicious, fresh bounty as possible.

I was happy to help with the eating.

In the Chinese five phase element philosophy, late summer corresponds to the Earth.

Earth is all about nourishment, the abundance of nature at this time of year that generously gives us almost more than we can handle. It is the nurturing love of a good parent that provides for their child’s needs. It is about home and comfort, being grounded and supported in the place that you live.

It’s about the inner peace of knowing that Earth will provide for you, that you will have enough to eat and a good home, that your basic needs are taken care of so that you can have the energy to live a good life. Earth is also about hard work. When the fruits and vegetables of the garden come in, it is time to harvest. The Earth has its own timeline, and if you can’t keep up, this abundance of food will rot and become compost.

The Physical and Mental/Emotional Aspects of the Earth Element 

Earth is a very physical element, and Chinese medicine theory indicates that it governs most of the digestive system. It governs how you take in food, process it into forms that your body can use, and then distribute that nourishment throughout the body. In this way, it acts like a good parent making sure all of the children are fed. When your Earth element is healthy, you have good energy and solid muscle mass. Emotionally, you have a sense of security.

When they have more than they need they are generous with others, like a parent, but they don’t give at the expense of their own well-being.

When a person’s Earth element is unhealthy, a person’s digestive system often doesn’t function well and they may have bloating, reflux, or an overproduction of mucus. They may be eating good food but the body isn’t able to properly make energy from it, so they are often fatigued. Emotionally, if the Earth element is impaired, a person may become needy or worried, because it feels like they don’t have enough.

Or they may become so used to not having enough that they can become hardened, and no longer can receive nurturing from others. The parenting aspect of the Earth element may go to extremes and they may become overbearing and controlling of others or may become self-sacrificing to the detriment of their own health. 

Mentally the Earth element governs digestion of ideas

This includes being able to take in information, break it into usable chunks, remember it and use that digested information to think clearly and create new ideas. Rumination is a word that I use to refer to both physical digestion and mental digestion – it applies perfectly to the function of the Earth element. A healthy Earth element is essential to being able to learn.

When the Earth element is out of balance then you may begin to overthink and worry, just going over the same thoughts and not getting anywhere. Or you may have brain fog and difficulty thinking at all. You may find it difficult to take in new information. It’s easy to get confused and stuck if your Earth element isn’t healthy.

There are two acupuncture meridians or organ networks in the body that belong to the fire element, these are the Stomach and the Spleen.

I will start with the Stomach organ system.

The Stomach is in charge of rotting and ripening the food that that you eat, but this doesn’t mean that it’s a bowl that food merely sits in as it decomposes. It can be thought of as the master chef, taking in food and cooking it, processing it, breaking it down into usable, nutritious pieces of energy (nutritive qi) and blood so that all of the nourishment and abundance from Mother Earth can be taken in and really feed us. All of the nutritive qi and blood that the Stomach has prepared then goes out to feed all of the other organs and tissues of the body.

Stomach imbalance can cause a range of issues, but the most common include malnutrition. Even if you are eating good food in appropriate amounts, the body can’t properly use it in this situation. You can also experience nausea and vomiting, where food doesn’t stay down and move through the body but goes back up instead.

In the mental/emotional sphere you might experience difficulty with processing information that has been communicated to you. There can be a lot of worry and anxiety – rumination – in a Stomach imbalance.

Now, I will consider the spleen organ system.

The Spleen is in charge of transportation and distribution. This is the network that takes the nutritive qi and blood that the Stomach has prepared and delivers it to all the organs, tissues and cells of the body. The Spleen is much like a network of delivery trucks. The organs and tissues can’t go out and pick up the nutrition that they need on their own.

Think about the experience so many of us had during the pandemic. We relied on UPS, the postal system and folks delivering food from grocery stores and restaurants in order to get what we needed for daily life. In a similar way, human health relies on the complex delivery system of the Spleen network. It makes sure that all parts of the body, all the organs, the muscles, the limbs, have the nourishment that they need.

If the Spleen is not healthy and unable to do its work, then nutrition doesn’t always get all the way out to all parts of our bodies.

In a spleen deficiency, you might experience cold hands and feet, weakness in your muscles or persistent fatigue. Many symptoms of Spleen trouble emerge when the normal transportation and transformation movement stops. Everything gets thick, slow and sticky.

This can result in build up of mucus in the head, chest, or intestines. You might have decreased lymphatic movement, or pooling of blood or fluids in the extremities – resulting in varicosities or edema. In people with uteruses this might show up as menstrual irregularities including blood clots, or lack of periods or painful periods.

In the mental and emotional sphere, if the Spleen is unhealthy then mental and emotional movement is impaired. It is difficult to move information from our memory stores into our conscious mind. Movement in general becomes difficult and you may become mentally lethargic and slow. It can become difficult to move forward toward goals, or come up with new ideas. You can find yourself stuck in the same old thought patterns, worries and insecurities. 

How to support a healthy Earth element

  • Eat to be Nurtured: Eat foods that you love, and eat them mindfully, really enjoying the flavor, appreciating where they came from and how they are nourishing you.
  • Nurture Your Microbiome: Eat fruits and vegetables that are in season, try to eat as many colors of the rainbow that you can each day, and try for 4-6 servings per day (a serving is generally 1/2 cup cooked or 1 cup uncooked). This nourishes you and it nourishes your intestinal microbiome, feeding the whole world of beneficial bacteria that live inside you. In turn those beneficial bacteria help your digestive system, your immune system and your nervous system stay healthy. 
  • Take Care of Yourself: Be generous with your love and caretaking, but if you start to feel burnt out or overstretched, know that it’s okay to take time to rest and take care of yourself. You can’t give if you are empty.
  • White and Red Chestnut Flower Essences: Use White and Red Chestnut flower essences if you are feel caught in unproductive cycles of worry and anxiety (the spinning hamster wheel of worry) and have a hard time thinking clearly because of it. White Chestnut is wonderful for calming and centering your thoughts when your are worrying about everything including yourself and the world. Red Chestnut helps when you can’t stop worrying about others.
  • Get Acupuncture!: Acupuncture is a wonderful way to support your Earth element, help keep your digestion healthy, calm worry and help with clear thinking. I am taking new patients at Watershed Wellness, and would be very happy to meet you.

Thanks for reading! May you love and feel nurtured, may you eat delicious meals, and may you enjoy a calm, clear mind. Enjoy late summer, the season of the Earth element!

Images created by author

Fire Season – Summer in the time of COVID

It is July 2021 as I write this, and my world is reopening from the long COVID lockdowns. Hooray! The world is reopening! I can see old friends and make new ones! I can see others’ smiling faces at the store and on the street! And yet, oh no! The world is reopening! Is it safe? What about my still vulnerable patients, friends and family members? How do I even socialize with people anyway? I’ve forgotten how to do this. 

Fire mandala image created by author

A friend of mine, Elaina, described our current situation as being like how she felt when she came back from a long period of study in China.

She was prepared for the culture shock of going to China. But she was unprepared for the reverse culture shock of coming back, of being expected to fit back into her old ways of doing things and relating to people when she had been someplace so different for so long. This is where we all are right now.

We have had to live life in an entirely different manner for over a year. How do we go back to the old way of doing things? Should we even go back to the old way?

These are central questions of the Chinese Fire phase element, the element of early to mid-Summer, and right on time, we are all having to deal with these questions. The fire element is all about love, connections, and boundaries.

How do we share or withhold warmth from and with each other and the world?

A healthy fire catches and keeps burning, but doesn’t go out of control like the forest fires we’ve had in the past few years. In people the fire element shows up similarly. Without enough fire we can have withdrawal, lack of connection, lack of laughter, coldness.

With too much fire we can have insomnia, mania, anxiety and lack of stability of our emotions. With a healthy amount of fire, we have an open connecting heart with good boundaries.

Connection and the Rose

Rose image created by author

The Rose is a symbol of the heart in many cultures, and it is a wonderful example of the fire element, which is why I added it to my fire illustration above. Flowers are beautiful, showing the world something spectacular, in the case of the rose, sending out an intoxicating aroma. They say, “Come here bees! Look at me! Smell me! Fertilize me! Like a fire they change quickly, here for a short time and then gone.

Many people can get that way as well during summer. It’s a time where a lot of us want to have fun, to play, show more skin, get outside and do things. We know it doesn’t last, so we want to make the most of the summer. For me, I knew summer was really here when a few weeks ago I was out at the beach, waiting for sunset with a bunch of new friends, laughing and dancing to music around a little fire.

There are four Chinese medicine organ systems in the body that belong to the fire phase element. The Heart, the Pericardium, the Small Intestine and the Triple Burner. I'll now explain each of these and finish up by suggesting how you can cultivate a healthy fire phase element in your own life.

The Heart

Fire bowl image created by author

The first of these is the Heart: in Chinese thought, the heart is the emperor or empress, the ruler of the body. But the work of the ruler is not to worry about every little thing in the body and mind. The ruler has people for that (in our bodies that’s the other organ networks). The ruler’s job is to remain open and connected to spirit, to contain and hold joy, to keep time and rhythm, steadily providing an even heartbeat.

A bowl or vessel can be a symbol of the heart, which is why the fire in the  illustration nearby springs up from a bowl. In ideal circumstances, the healthy heart is like an empty bowl. It’s not so filled up with stressors or worries or obsessions that it’s not able to feel love and calmness.

Keeping the bowl open and empty so that we can invite in greater love and higher connection is what makes a healthy heart.

The Heart and the Shen 神 Birds

Shen 神 is a Chinese word for spirit, and it has been likened to sweetly singing birds that nest in that open bowl space of the heart. To nurture the birds of the spirit, the heart bowl needs to be a calm, inviting space. However there are things in this world, severe stressors, shocks and traumas, that can cause those birds to fly from their nest. When that happens we don’t feel like ourselves. We may feel disassociated or numb, we may have a hard time speaking, we may be out of control or fearful and not know why. In these cases it can take time to coax those birds of the spirit back into the heart, to make their nest a safe place again.

The work of healing trauma is long and complex, involving body, emotions, mind and spirit.

The Heart Protector, or Pericardium

Fire dog image created by author

Because of how important a healthy and peaceful heart is, there are three other fire meridians that help to protect its peace. Surrounding the heart physically is the pericardium. The animal that corresponds to the Pericardium or Heart Protector meridian is the dog. The image of the dog in the fire illustration is a painting of one of my favorite doggos, Jethro.

Jethro embodies all of the aspects of the Heart Protector. A pit bull-mastiff mix, he is big, muscular and can appear dangerous. When a strange person or other animal approaches he has a loud fearsome bark to scare them away. However in truth he is a gentle giant, a snuggle bug who wants to crawl in your lap, or press his head into your hands so that you will scratch it for hours straight.

The healthy Heart Protector is like this, maintaining emotional boundaries so that those who are unsafe for us are kept out, and those who are safe are welcomed in.

The Small Intestine

The Small Intestine is another fire organ network. It helps us decide what is important and what isn’t. With food this translates into deciding what to absorb. With emotions and thoughts, this means that it acts almost like a secretary to the Empress or Emperor the Heart, deciding what thoughts or emotions are important enough to go to the head of the kingdom, and what would just cause needless stress and can go in the recycling basket.

The Triple Burner 

The Triple Burner is somewhat complicated in its physical functions. It regulates fluid metabolism and other aspects of physiology. With respect to the Heart, its mental-emotional role is to regulate the boundaries between our Heart and groups of people and our wider social role, much like the Heart Protector does in more intimate one-to-one relationships. The social-emotional aspect of the Triple Burner helps us to navigate at work, in the grocery store, and talking or performing in front of groups. It helps us know when it’s safe to let our fire shine and when we need to hold back to protect our heart.

Keeping Your Fire Element Healthy

Now for some recommendations you can try to keep your fire phase element healthy, whatever the season.

1. Nourish Fire with Connections

Connect with friends, family. pets and others who see and appreciate your inner fire, your inner you, and who care for you just as you are. If they are nearby and you can see them in person, great! If not, call, text, email or send them a video message. Connections don’t just need to be with people you know! Books, movies, podcasts can connect you to so many others through time and place. Read or watch or listen to stories or ideas that open your heart and mind.

2. Laugh!

Laughter is the sound of the fire element. What makes you laugh? Is it funny movies or books or comics? Is it your dog or your cat or your kids or grandkids? Find something that makes you laugh every day.

3. Cultivate a sense of awe

Studies have shown that experiencing the sense of awe at least once a day helps your sense of well being, helps you make better decisions, and leads to greater life satisfaction. Awe is that feeling that comes from seeing or experiencing or learning something that expands our way of seeing the world and gives us a sense of something bigger than ourselves.  On the North Coast we are rich in awe inspiring experiences. Most of the time we just have to look out the window to see the Columbia River, the forests, or the Pacific Ocean. Awe inspiring beauty is all around us.

4. Try this Heart meditation

I learned this simple meditation from my teacher Lorie Dechar, who learned it from the Heart Math Institute:

  • Focus on your heart – imagine the space in your chest where your heart sits. You can put a hand over your heart to help.
  • Breathe into your heart – take six or seven breaths, imagining that your breath is going into the space in your heart.
  • Feel into your heart – imagine a place or person or animal that brings you a positive feeling, and keep breathing into your heart as you imagine bringing the positive image and feeling into your heart space.

5. Use “Rescue Remedy”

This blend of five Bach flower essences is readily available in stores or at the clinic and is something I recommend often to folks who are experiencing great stress, or those who have had a shock or trauma that is keeping their heart from feeling calm and relaxed, or has caused those Shen birds to have flown from the nest altogether, leaving them feeling as if they aren’t connected to their body.

Four drops or one tablet, four times per day can be very helpful at easing some of that stress. Finding a good counselor is essential as well and an important part of healing the heart and mind. You don’t have to go it alone. 

6. Get Acupuncture!

Acupuncture is a wonderful way to support your fire element, calm stress and anxiety, and help with the healing of heart and mind. I am taking new acupuncture patients at Watershed Wellness, and would be very happy to meet you.

Thanks for reading! Now go out and laugh, feel awe, connect, and enjoy the summer, the season of the Fire element!

Water to Wood – Lessons from the Birth of Spring

a
Mandala of the main symbols of Water, by Melinda Nickels

 

The five elemental phases, also known as the five elements, are a key theoretical structure of Chinese medicine.

The five phases are:

  • Water / 水 / Shui
  • Wood / 木 / Mu
  • Fire / 火 / Huo
  • Earth / / Tu
  • Metal /金 / Jin

The phases are not static, but flow in a cycle, one generating the next.

The Chinese correlated each of the phases to a season. The water phase element relates to winter. The wood phase element relates to spring. The fire phase element relates to summer. The earth phase element relates to late summer. The metal phase element relates to fall. At the time I am writing this article, we are at the end of winter moving into spring. This means we're experiencing the shift from the Water phase element into the Wood phase element.

In Winter there is Water.

A few years ago I was lucky to be in Hawaii for a class in February, and I spent a lot of time on the beach just sitting and looking at waves and listening to their rumble and crash and swish. For me it was an experience that was healing. The wordless time helped me to refuel after a depleting stretch of months. The water phase has this quality. In East Asian traditional medicine it is thought to be the original source, a deep well of energy that you are born with and draw on through your life.

It is dark, quiet, a womb, wordless, original and first.

It corresponds to winter, which in nature is the time of hibernation, sleep, the time of waiting and regeneration. Water is the mother of the next phase or element, wood, but we can’t rush that transition (as much as we might want to get to Spring sometimes) we have to give it it’s quiet time so that we can sleep, and heal, and regenerate. We need to go inward to the dark, to listen to our deepest quiet self, to give ourselves time to just be. All of nature in our latitudes needs this quiet time. If we try to skip it, try to push through we risk burning up and burning out.

Wood comes soon enough!

Water can also be compared to a seed. Buried underground and in some places under snow. Dormant. Waiting. But at some point, the seasons change. We start to move into Spring. There’s a different feeling in the air. Maybe it’s the little more sunlight that signals us. Spring starts to move, everywhere around us and in us as well.

The Wood element is all about that feeling of spring.

Mandala of the main symbols of Wood, by Melinda Nickels

Wood refers to living plants. Its color is that bright, new green that you see in new leaves, just as they pop out. There’s a tremendous amount of energy in this new phase. Think of what it must take for a seed to go from this thing that almost looks like a little rock, to burst up and out and grow and grow and grow, as much as it can, as exuberantly as it can, until it reaches the potential of who it can be.

That drive to grow and change and be is incredibly powerful. People who have a lot of wood energy tend to have a voice that always sounds like a shout. Little kids tend to be more woody than adults—think of a playground and all the yelling and exuberance.

The emotion associated with the Wood phase is anger.

This can be a tough thing. Some of us (I’m thinking of myself) tend to avoid anger. And why? I’d say for myself I’m afraid of that anger that comes from frustration and lashes out indiscriminately. I don’t want to get hurt by that stuff! And I don’t want to hurt other people. And that can be what Wood anger is if it is repressed, or stifled, or misdirected.

But Wood anger can also be a virtuous thing. It can be thought of Constructiveness, or Heroism. Healthy Wood anger is seeing that things are unfair, to yourself but especially to others, and using that tremendous energy of Spring, of the growing plant, to speak up, do something to correct that unfairness. It’s Robin Hood and Joan of Arc and Martin Luther King Jr.

There are ways we can best stay in balance as we move into the Wood phase element.

  • Like a growing plant, we need to move! Get your body moving with a walk, dancing, or other exercise every day. This will help with releasing stress and improving circulation, two aspects of a healthy wood element.
  • Clean out the waste from winter so that you can use all that Spring-Wood energy! Drink lots of clean fresh water every day. The organs of Wood are the liver and gallbladder. Herbs such as Milk Thistle, Burdock, Oregon Grape and Nettles can be supportive to your liver and gallbladder health. Nettles are also great for spring allergies.
  • Garden! Plant your own leafy greens, which are also great for liver health and feed healthy gut bugs.

In the coming months, I will post more about the other phase elements as we move through their seasons. Until then, go out and grow!